Zimbabwe latest: Thousands celebrate end of Mugabe era

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Jubilant scenes are unfolding on the streets of Zimbabwe’s capital Harare, as protests demanding the resignation of President Robert Mugabe have turned into a celebration of the army’s role in ending his grip on power.

BBC correspondents say protesters are hugging and cheering soldiers in the crowd.

One demonstrator told the BBC the day was “about a new beginning”.

The rally is supported by the army and members of the ruling Zanu-PF party.

War veterans – who until last year were loyal to the president – are also saying Mr Mugabe should quit. The mix of people at the rally is unprecedented, correspondents say.

The BBC’s Andrew Harding in Harare says this is a watershed moment and there can be no return to power for Mr Mugabe.

One man arriving at the rally said: “As Zimbabweans, we are saying to our army – thank you very much for the peaceful intervention.

“And it’s time for the masses of Zimbabwe to say: Mugabe must go and must go, like, yesterday. We can’t wait to see his back. For us, it’s about the end of authoritarian rule and we are going to take our Zimbabwe back.”

The representative of Zanu-PF in London, Nick Mangwana, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that the party would feed protesters at a rally outside Mr Mugabe’s home, and would “not be leaving until they have a letter of resignation”.

“This could be over in 20 minutes,” he said. “People arrive, he resigns, people go away, it’s over.”

Mr Mugabe, 93, had been under house arrest since the army takeover on Wednesday, but on Friday he made his first public appearance. He spoke only to open the graduation at a university of which he is chancellor.

His wife, Grace, was not present. It had been thought she had left the country but it emerged on Thursday that she was at home with Mr Mugabe.

Image copyright EPA
Image caption The message for the Mugabes was clear

The military made its move after a power struggle over the successor for Mr Mugabe.

He sacked Vice-President Emmerson Mnangagwa last week, apparently to pave the way for Grace Mugabe, who is four decades younger than him, to take over the presidency.

The military said it was “engaging” with Mr Mugabe and would advise the public on the outcome of talks “as soon as possible”.

Mr Mugabe has led Zimbabwe since it gained independence from Britain in 1980.


Fear has lifted overnight

Analysis by the BBC’s Andrew Harding in Harare

Euphoric crowds are surging through the centre of Harare, chanting “He must go!” and waving placards demanding President Mugabe’s immediate resignation. People are sitting on their cars, horns blaring, and on top of buses, holding Zimbabwean flags.

“This is a revolution,” said one man emerging from a supermarket to join the protesters. “It has been a long time coming.”

For years such scenes have been unthinkable in Zimbabwe, but the army and governing Zanu-PF gave these rallies their blessing, and the fear that held back so many people appears to have lifted overnight.

“We just want change,” said a woman in a long queue outside a bank in the centre of Harare. Others spoke of the country’s deep economic problems and its soaring unemployment, and hoped that a change of leadership might improve people’s lives.

Image copyright EPA
Image caption The rally is going ahead with the blessing of the military and the ruling party

The governing party – now ruthlessly purging itself – will be hoping to retain its iron grip on power in Zimbabwe, but today’s extraordinary street protests may have unlocked forces that will be hard to control.

Who is backing the protest in Harare?

  • The influential war veterans’ association. Leader Christopher Mutsvangwa had called for a huge turnout, saying: “We want to restore our pride.”
  • The ruling Zanu-PF. At least eight out of 10 regional branches voted on Friday for Mr Mugabe to resign as president and party secretary. Several regional leaders appeared on TV saying he should step down, Grace Mugabe should resign from the party and Mr Mnangagwa should be reinstated to the central committee.
  • The Zimbabwe Defence Forces (ZDF) said the rally was a “solidarity march”. It said: “As long as the planned march remains orderly, peaceful… and without hate speech and incitement to cause violence, it fully supports the march.”
  • Liberal groups opposed to the president. The leader of last year’s #Thisflag protests, Evans Mwarire, urged people to turn up.

How did we get here?

Soldiers seized the headquarters of Zimbabwe’s national broadcaster ZBC on Wednesday, and loud explosions and gunfire were heard.

Maj Gen Sibusiso Moyo then read out a statement on national television, assuring the nation that President Mugabe and his family were safe.

The military was only targeting what he called “criminals” around the president, he said, denying that there had been a coup.

On Thursday, Mr Mugabe was pictured smiling as he took part in talks with an army general and South African government ministers at State House but sources suggested he might be resisting pressure to resign.


What has been the reaction around the world?

  • US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson urged a quick return to civilian rule, but also said the crisis was an opportunity for Zimbabwe to set itself on a new path
  • Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Beijing was hoping for stability and a peaceful “appropriate” resolution
  • UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson warned against a transition from “one unelected tyrant” to another
  • Botswana’s President Ian Khama said regional leaders did not support Mr Mugabe staying in power
  • Alpha Conde, the chairman of the African Union, a key regional bloc, said the takeover “seems like a coup” and demanded a return to constitutional order
  • South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma said the region was committed to supporting the people of Zimbabwe, and was optimistic the situation could be resolved amicably
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